Posts Tagged ‘Monkey and Bird’

Fun Size Mini-Comics

Tuesday, October 23rd, 2012

Halloween is quickly sneaking up on us and soon we will have to contend with costume clad  trick-or-treaters looking for candy at our door. It only takes one stop in the candy isle at the local grocery store to know that the huge candy bars we received as kids have be reduced to microscopic proportions. Some marketing genius coined the term Fun Size to describe these shrunken delights and the moniker has stuck. This year there is even a Halloween themed movie  bearing the title Fun Size.

Over the years, the practice of strangers doling out candy to children has become suspect as more and more sociopathic idiots get their jollies by lacing the goodies with drugs, poison, strait pins and razor blades. My family has turned to handing out inexpensive novelties that can be purchased in bulk from any number of mail order companies like U.S. Toy or Oriental Trading. The little trinkets that might consist of spider rings, monster teeth, tattoos, or rubber bugs are quite popular with the kids and relieve parents of the threat of tainted treats.

Inspired by the wide variety of mini comics that small independent publishers have been producing including CO2 Comics’ own creative duet, Joe Williams and Tina Garceau whose Monkey and Bird mini comic can be found here, I thought it would be great to hand out hand-made, Fun Size Mini Comics to trick or treaters this year.

Monkey And Bird mini comic cover

This is an inexpensive and novel way for comic creators to get the word out as to who is the coolest cartoonist in the neighborhood. It is also a fun introduction to the process of comic production and a unique calling card when promoting your creative services in this difficult market for cartoonists, illustrators and graphic designers.

These 32 page self-covered Fun Size Mini Comics can be black and white, black ink printed on color paper, full color, or color covers with black interior. Their final size is approximately 2.5″ x 2″ They are printed 2 sided on a single sheet of 8.5″ x 11″ paper either on your own printer at home or at a copy house like Staples or Kinkos. Fold them by hand, trim with a scissors or paper cutter and bind with a single staple.

Because the page size is so small art should be simple and graphic with minimal dialogue. You can focus on Halloween images, images lifted from your sketchbook,  or a more ambitiously composed story. Someone with limited art ability could use clip art with snappy one liners  on each page. Be creative. Have fun.

The hardest part of the process once the content is created, is figuring out the pagination. to get an idea of where each page lies, fold a piece of 8.5″ x 11″ paper in half four times. It is important to always fold the paper the same way each time so be very careful to take note Trim the top side and bottom leaving the spine in tact. Number each page taking note of the top and bottom of each page. Fold another piece of paper the same way but do not cut it. Unfold both papers carefully marking the page number and directions on the uncut paper using the trimmed version as your guide. You can now create a template on Photoshop, Illustrator, or a fresh blank piece of paper. Insert or paste art into the appropriate spot careful to face it in the right direction as some will be mounted upside down.

Pagination front & back

Once you have laid out the art for both sides of the paper have it printed two sided on a single sheet. Make as many copies as you think you will need. Fold them neatly using a folding bone or a burnisher to make crisp folds.  Staple the spine with a single staple using any decent household or office stapler. Open your comic in the middle and lay it face down in the stapler so the bent side of the staple will be  inside of the comic. Needless to say the staple should run in the same direction as the spine. Trim the top, side and bottom of the comic using a sharp pair of scissors or a paper cutter. Be sure all the pages are separated cleanly after you have trimmed your comic.

This Fun Sized Mini Comic is a great treat for the kids on Halloween or any holiday and is a wonderful project for cartoonists and their families to participate in together. This is also a great project for educators that may be teaching cartooning or are looking for a creative project in an art or literature class. If you might be thinking about using the Fun Sized Mini Comic as a promotional tool make sure that your name and contact information is prominently displayed on on the cover. Please also remember that if you are making the Fun Size Mini Comic to be handed out to children on Halloween, be sure that the content, including  any contact info or websites that may be on your comic, is appropriate for young children or you will have parents banging on your door the next day.

Making Comics Because We Want to,

Gerry Giovinco

Stop the Presses: Part 2

Tuesday, March 27th, 2012


At the turn of the second millennium it was Johannes Gutenberg’s invention of the printing press that was identified as having the greatest influence on humankind in the last thousand years. The printing press revolutionized the way information was disseminated and created a greater opportunity for education and the spread of social culture throughout the world. There surely would have been no comic books without the printing press and what a tragedy that would have been! We have to give credit to printers for their role and influence in the medium.

Though Richard F. Outcault’s Yellow Kid, heavily influenced by the use of colored inks in the printing process and published in 1895 is widely considered as the first comic strip because of its use of word balloons, it was a printer, Benjamin Franklin, who created and published in 1754 the first editorial cartoon in America, composed of an illustration of a snake with a severed head and the printed words “Join, or Die.”

Franklin who had been apprenticed as a printer to his older brother James left Boston and opened his own print shop in Philadelphia at the age of seventeen. Franklin often used his political cartoons in his publications  to advise readers about politics and the social unrest of the colonies that would lead to the American Revolution.

Like Franklin’s publications, early comics were printed on letterpresses where  engraved or photo-etched images and moveable type were covered with ink and pressed onto the surface of the paper which would then be folded,  trimmed and bound into a pamphlet. The size of the paper sheet dictated the final size of the original comic books which was about 7 1/4″ x 10 1/4.” The sheet of paper printed on both sides is considered a signature. Each signature has has eight pages on each side resulting in comic books  having page counts in increments of sixteen.

The early comics generally consisted of four signatures giving them a sixty-four page count plus an additional cover. Today’s comics usually have two signatures equalling thirty-two pages plus a cover. More recently, as discussed in  Stop The Presses Part 1 comics are using a self cover format meaning that the entire comic, including the cover, is generated by the two bound signatures.

Front and back of Signature #1

Joe Williams, co-creator  of CO2 Comics’ feature Monkey and Bird and all around great guy has a wonderful blog post showing how to set up the page layout for a print signature that is 12″ x 18.”  These dimensions are quite different than that of a traditional comic but it is a great illustration of how pagination works and clearly shows how the print size of the paper will dictate the size of the final comic.

Gerard Jones in his incredibly fascinating book, Men of Tomorrow, describes how Jewish immigrant printers played a specific role in the development of the comic book. He contends that these immigrants were dependent on having their own letterpresses so they could print with their distinctive Hebrew type faces. In a search for ways to keep their presses running, along with mob associations in this Depression /Prohibition Era, these printers relied on popular and inexpensive products like pulp magazines  and comic books that could be distributed along with  booze and other contraband to a large network of city news stands.

Jones tracks the corrupt exploits of  Harry Donenfeld and the evolution of his family run printing company through the $130 acquisition of Superman from two other young Jewish men, Jerry Seigel and Joe Shuster. The ensuing unexpected and overwhelming success of comic books featuring The Man of Steel sealed the comic book’s place in history as an icon of popular culture and created an industry that no longer was dependent on mob money to support it.

Publishing comics became more glamorous than just printing them and soon the job of printing the comics was farmed out to larger printers who could handle the massive duty of printing millions of comic books each month and distributing them to a national audience.  Eventually only one printer would dominate the production of comic books for decades.

To be continued…

Celebrating Thirty Years of Comics History!

Gerry Giovinco


Mini Comics to the Packaging Revolution

Monday, September 12th, 2011

Monkey & Bird…a Love Story by Joe Williams and Tina Garceau is AVAILABLE NOW!!!

The highlight of my week was receiving a copy of Joe Williams and Tina Garceau’s printed mini comic, Monkey and Bird, in the mail. Snail mail, that is.

Back in August we featured a couple of posts by Señor Williams that outlined his experience personally  making the mini comic. He peppered his posts with so many juicy details that almost anyone could go out and make one themselves.

I’ve known Joe and his lovely wife Tina for years, we go all the way back to our college days at PCA and I am well aware of both of their incredible attention to detail and quality not to mention their brilliance as designers yet I still did not expect to be so taken by what a gem their mini comic turned out to be.

Holding Monkey and Bird in my hand as a mini comic was a defining moment for me especially after having published it as a web comic here at CO2 Comics for the last two years. Maybe my reaction is a reflection of my long history of publishing on paper or just evidence of a generational  preference for things printed on paper, but I liked it. A lot!

The web affords us comic creators so many options to be able to present our labors of love to a potentially vast audience with minimal expenses compared to the printed product. Everything about making comics for the internet is so much more convenient and spontaneous that it has given us the opportunity as creators and readers to be able to witness the biggest creative explosion of the medium in its history. All those virtues, however, in my jaded eyes, do not supersede the experience of reading comics in print. I will always have a warm place in my heart for the tangible paper package.

mathmanauts

Mimeograph machine

It has always been clear to me that a comic is never complete until it is in front of an audience. The reader’s experience is a much a part of the final execution of the comic  as any step taken in the creative process along the way. Because I have always felt so strongly about this I began publishing my own comics almost as early as I began creating them. My first published comics were printed on a mimeograph machine. My audience had as much fun smelling them as they did reading them. I slowly graduated to photocopiers and small offset presses before finally dealing with  large, commercial, four-color presses to make Comico comics.

Comico Covers

As I sit here holding Joe and Tina’s  32 page (including covers),  full color, 4 x 5.5 inch, landscaped pamphlet that  is hand folded and saddle stitched with a good old-fashioned Swingline stapler I can’t imagine what my comic producing  experience would have been like if I would have had these production capabilities available to me back in the seventies. I would have traded tracing mimeo stencils and hand cranking purple inked copies for full-color pages spat out of an ink jet or laser printer in a heartbeat!

I did not have an opportunity to go to SPX this weekend but my fond memories of past shows include my amazement of the array of unique and creative packaging techniques that are always displayed. Monkey and Bird would have fit right in! Today’s community of independent comic artists and publishers take full advantage of the technology available to make comics that deliver an experience well beyond panel-to-panel sequential art.

Many people are pondering what is to become of the familiar pamphlet style comic that has been a fixture in the industry for over seventy years. Most believe that digital content will force it into extinction in the not too distant future, watching the sun set on a beloved package.

When I look at my little copy of Monkey and Bird, or think about what I witness at shows like SPXAPE, MOCCA, PACC and Stumptown, I see a different horizon, the shimmering rays of a new day cast by the lights of endless creative opportunity that will offer comics in print and digitally in infinite shapes and sizes. Each format, unique to its creator and not limited by the constraints of a few publishers or a single distributor.

I remember the first glimpse I ever had of this expanding possibility. In 1980 I was mesmerized by the first issue of Francoise Mouly and Art Spiegelman‘s anthology comic magazine RAW. The full color view out the window of a man committing suicide had been pasted on to the black and white cover of the tabloid sized periodical publication that featured an insane amount of groundbreaking comic art between its pages. The simple collage of the cover alone was enough to have numbed my creative mind for decades, especially in regards to packaging.

RAW

That, to me, was the beginning. Now, the art of making comics has firmly expanded from mastery of designing a page to the mastery of designing the whole package wether in print, on the web, or digitally for a specific device. The day where packaging that requires an entire production team is passing. The comic artist, if they choose, now has the ability to have complete control over the reading experience of the audience if they want it.

As a publisher, like CO2 Comics, today’s technology gives us the opportunity to open new doors of creative discussion with the artists that makes making comics more exciting than ever before. We plan to enjoy every minute of it!

Making Comics Because I Want To

Gerry Giovinco


CO2 Years Old!

Monday, July 4th, 2011

Can you believe it? Two years have gone by since we launched CO2 Comics hoping it would become a unique cooperative of comic talent featuring a collective of great comic features. Naturally we initially turned to our long time friends and allies that have had ties with us since our days as founding publishers of Comico the Comic Company.

Comico The Comic Company owners, Top: Dennis LaSorta, Phil Lasorda, Bottom: Gerry Giovinco, Bill Cucinotta

Chris Kalnick, Joe Williams, Andrew C. Murphy, Reggie Byers, Bernie Mirealut, Bill Anderson, Rich Rankin and Neil Vokes all contributed to the early success of the realization of our goals for CO2 Comics. The faith that they all had in our ability to  present their work while respecting their rights as creators, supporting their complete ownership and actively promoting their features and services as artists was a complete and humbling honor.

It became our duty to surround their works with with other great features and talent. CO2 Comics was always intended to be a place where readers could come to enjoy one feature and discover other comic treasures that they may not have found if those works had stood by themselves.

In just two years the list of contributers has grown to include twenty-two talented creators and two dozen exciting comic features. The impressive list of talent yields a number of nominated and award winning creators along with brilliant new talent that will deserve recognition for their mastery of the medium.

Take a look at the roster of creators here at CO2 Comics and you are bound to be amazed at the comic book pedigree and variety that exists on our site:

Bill Anderson – Skrog


Kevin Atkinson – Eaten by Planet 29

Mike Baron – The World of Ginger Fox

Reggie Byers – Crescent


Bill Cucinotta – Death for a Dollar


Skrog


Tina Garceau – Hot Topics


Monkey and Bird

There’s No Escape From A Deadline


Gerry Giovinco – Slaughterman


Robert Jackson, Jr. – The Amazing Liberteens


Chris Kalnick – Depth Charge

Non


Onrie Kompan – Yi Soon Shin


Steve Lafler – Dog Boy


El Vocho


Mike Leeke – The Amazing Liberteens

Liberteens Update

Don Lomax – Captain Obese


Bernie Mireault – Cable

Death for a Dollar


Isaac vs. Eli


Of the Spheres


To Get Her

The Jam Lives (a motion comic)


Andrew C. Murphy – Pressed for Time


Reflections

Victor


Mitch O’Connell – The World of Ginger Fox


Rich Rankin – Gauntlet


Raine Szramski – Heaven and the Dead City


Frank Thorne – Ribit


Giovanni Paolo Timpano – Yi Soon Shin

Neil Vokes – Gauntlet


Joe Williams – Hot Topics


Monkey and Bird


There’s No Escape From A Deadline


Besides having published over 800 pages of comic art in the last two years we have also taken on the monumental task of publishing David Anthony Kraft’s COMICS INTERVIEW: The Complete Collection. The first of the eleven volume set had 680 pages that were painstakingly cleaned and reproduced in both paperback and hardback editions. Volume two is currently in the works. This project is the testimony to our love of the comics medium and its rich history.

COMICS INTERVIEW: The Complete Collection

Our commitment to the history  of comics and the current state of the industry is also highlighted weekly on our CO2 Comics Blog where we feature a  weekly article covering everything from our Comico history, production techniques, creator’s rights and frequent editorializing on the state of the market have drawn a lot of attention industry wide.

As if publishing a ton of great comic related material on the web and in print is not enough for two guys,  we needed to create a new imprint, CO2 Publications so we could publish a 372 page literary book, FOR THE CONVENIENCE OF THE GOVERNMENT A Memoir of Veteran discharged from the Navy for being Gay  written by  George Richard Phillip Zimmerman, Jr. which was just released over Memorial Day Weekend.

For The Convenience Of The Government

Over our first two years we have published nearly 2,000 pages of material and maintained a rigorous schedule on an exciting site that has attracted over 4.6 million hits to date.

The best part is, WE ARE JUST GETTING STARTED! Last year, as we celebrated our first anniversary, we compared our accomplishments to our early publishing days with Comico and noted that we were far out front and we still are, thanks to the support of all the great talent that joins us and allows us to present new work daily.

We also need to thank our readers who continue to grow in numbers. Thanks for stopping by and for sharing with your friends. We became comic publishers nearly thirty years ago because we believed our comics were not finished works until they were experienced by the readers. We recognized early on that as publishers we played a significant role in the realization of a comic as a completed work and we intend to continue to be that conduit. CO2 Comic’s mission is to get great comics in front of as many eyes as possible. Please help us with your enthusiasm by continuing to share the comics you enjoy here with your friends and by returning often.

Finally, it is no mistake that we celebrate our anniversary  over the Fourth of July weekend. As publishers we have always been motivated by the spirit of the Independent movement with our emphasis being on creator’s rights.  Comics, for us, are a medium of freedom. Free thought, free speech, free enterprise.

We want to turn  Independence Day into Independents Day for comic fans and make it a time to celebrate the diversity that all of the Independent comics publishers have brought to the world. There are a lot of great comics out there that are not brought to you by the usual pair of suspects and we hope hat you will continue to find some of the best of them right here at CO2 Comics.

Making Comics Because We Want To

Bill Cucinotta and Gerry Giovinco


Repartee

Monday, May 16th, 2011

Over the last few weeks I took the time to outline the Process of Penciling for Comics. There were no lessons on how to draw or develop a sequential story line. It was just a quick look at the actual physical process of preparing to work and a description of the essential tools that make the job easier. It was a look at the traditional way of making comics that many people who have not converted to an all digital workflow enjoy and are comfortable with.

More specifically it was a description of how I like to work when creating comics while deferring to many other options that are available. How each individual artist works is a very personal ritual and I will be the first to say that there is no right or wrong way provided the final image is the intended expression of the idea that the artist was attempting to convey.

Coincidentally the very talented Raine Szramski, whose comic Heaven and the Dead City graces the web pages of CO2 Comics, was haggling with someone on Facebook over her own process of creating comics. Her reactionary post read like this:

Painting by hand obsolete and old-fashioned….?
I just had someone ask me why I’m bothering to paint my comic by hand since (as he says) my style will become obsolete and I’ll “learn to jump on the Photoshop bandwagon.” And he used the strange example of Borders Bookstore as being “old-fashioned” as opposed to digital and “that’s why they went out of business.” Umm, there are many OTHER reasons they went out of business and it has nothing to do with not using Photoshop.
GRRRRRR….. Anyway, to say the least I was a bit offended. Thoughts??


Well, it is nice to know that the creators who give us the opportunity to post their work here on CO2 Comics stick together and have each other’s back.

Joe Williams to the rescue!

Joe, who is responsible for the very clever Monkey and Bird comic that he co-creates with his lovely wife Tina Garceau launched into a witty defense of Raine on his own blog at Willceau illo. You can read his lambasting here:

Raine! Raine! Don’t Go Away! or Pigments Versus Pixels

Joe follows up the next week with another protective zinger:

Raining on Raine’s Parade

Joe even suggested that we follow up the Process of Penciling feature with a look at Raine’s Painting Process which she happily agreed to allow us to present as follows:

If anyone is curious, this is how I paint my pages. Up on the easel is an upcoming page in progress, with a photocopy of my unpainted pencils taped next to it for reference. (I could get in closer, but it would be a story spoiler…)

Necessary for ongoing work…Dog Under Computer Desk…
Note as well as my Waterhouse print that I haven’t hung up yet because I have to buy some nails. Um, I’ll get around to it…


Cat at Drawing Table…
There always needs to be a cat in the vicinity of the drawing table. Very important.
This is GoGo.


Box o’ gouache, sketches, paper towels, props…
That’s Yaira’s hat, by the way. I got it at a Rennaissance Festival years ago.


A shelf of brushes, Pigma pens, inks, templates, pencils, etc.,etc. The big daruma on the far right was given to me by my friend Satomi. For those who don’t know it’s a Japanese tradition to give one eye a pupil and make a wish. If your wish comes true, you fill in the other pupil. (You can see that the smaller daruma has 2 eyes filled in!)


Lots and lots of gray gouache. Very messy. But that’s why it’s more fun than Photoshop!


The next 50-plus pages of “Heaven & the Dead City” that need lettering and the pecilling finished before I even begin to paint them… Yup, I’m in this for the long haul. Mind you, this is just for Chapter Three.


And most importantly–FUEL. Coffee and keep it coming. The cup was designed by Mark Trepel (and is available at Cafe Press) and actually features 2 black Maneki Nekos.


This is a rough sketchbook drawing of Yaira that will be turned into a color painting. It will be a bit like the Swamp painting, with a decorative border and background architecture. The color scheme will probably be rose and gold (sunset colors.)


What did I tell you? The creative process is very personal and Raine just proved it. I can guarantee that I have never heard that a cat and a dog were a necessary element of a productive studio! Fortunately I have a few of each. I can’t wait to see how my work may improve once I get them into my studio space!

Speaking of studio space, Raine says, “I only wish I had a cooler, less sloppy studio space to show off rather than a corner of a studio apartment. Maybe it will let people know that yes, you too can be this messy and still be creative.”

Raine, my studio is in the garage, and I am so messy that on a good day you’d swear I was a refugee from the A&E’s Hoarder’s show. I think the creative chaos breeds entropy which results in progressive works.

The bottom line is in the final quality of the work. How you get to that point is ultimately your call and regardless of how you do it the important thing is that you actually do it. Most people just dream of doing things. By doing it, and doing it your way, you are already head and shoulders above the crowd.

Making Comics Because I Want to

Gerry Giovinco


The Comic Company:
Duckwork

Tuesday, August 3rd, 2010

 

Enter at your own risk

 
An ominous, orange glow cast its pall across South Philadelphia in the spring of 1981. It was a sign plastered with fluorescent tempera paint on a thirteenth floor window of the ARCO Building on Broad and Spruce streets, home of most of the classes taught at PCA, Philadelphia College of Art which is now known as the University of the Arts, one of the most respected art colleges in the country.
 

Room with a view

 
The letters that read “DUCKWORK” could be seen as far south as Veterans Stadium where the Phillies had won the World Series just months before and marched past PCA in their triumphant parade that rocked the City of Brotherly Love.

Behind the window was the office of a motley group of art students banded together to publish a “student” newspaper by the same name.
 

John "Bondo" Rondeau settles in front of a huge print that we had "aquired" from a show at PCA that featured a famous cartoonist alumnus, Anrnold Roth, who ironically had been expelled from the school when he was a student.

 
DUCKWORK, though tacitly supported by the school, was never a school newspaper. It was a publication commandeered by an assembly of comic art enthusiasts led by myself that defiantly produced comics in an educational environment that, at the time, considered the medium to be kitsch and derivative.
 

DUCKWORK Covers 1 & 2, Cover #1 illustrated by Bill "Fostex" Foster, #2 by Gerry Giovinco with inks by Bill Anderson

 
Our pseudo-fraternity proclaimed each of us as DUCKS and, as a proud rogue clan, we wreaked havoc on the school with our publication and our mischievous pranks some of which might have us arrested if done today.
 

Bill Bryan who is now at CBR Woodworking where thay make incredible furniture for offices and corporate spaces among other things. http://www.cbrwoodworking.com/index.html


 

Evan Nurse was a Jr. Duck who attended a cartooning class on weekends at PCA for young students. Evan's senior prank at Sharon hill H.S. was to join the girls Lacross team. They let him play but they made him wear the kilt. He is now an AV instructor at an area High School.

 
PCA had very little sense of community at the time. Because of this, our little group managed to control Student Council and Arts Council giving us the opportunity to allocate funds and office space for our ventures. The DUCKS ruled!
 

DUCKWORK Covers 3 & 4, both illustrated by Gerry Giovinco

 
DUCKWORK quickly became a magnet for cartoonists especially after it became known that I was attempting to start a comic book company named Comico with two friends of mine from high school, Phil LaSorda and Vince Argondezzi.
 

DUCKWORK Covers 5 & 6, #5 illustrated by Bill "Cooch" Cucinotta, #6 by Matt wagner

 
Bill Cucinotta, my partner here at CO2 Comics, knew of me and Comico from Creation Conventions and was enthusiastically involved with DUCKWORK from the start.

Nick-named Cooch, his loyalty and ability to get the job done whenever needed along with his knowledge of the direct market derived from his experience working retail at Fat Jack’s Comic Crypt, Philly’s premier comic shop made him invaluable. It would later make him the most logical choice to fill the void left by Vince Argondezzi’s abrupt departure from Comico’s initial partnership well before our first book Comico Primer would be published.
 

Edwin Arocho is now a fine artist and musician living in San Juan, Puerto Rico

 
The list of colorful guys and gals that frequented DUCKWORK’s office is peppered with talented artists that went on to creative careers. I’ve included photos of several DUCKS. It is easy to see that besides comics, we were seemingly, also influenced by the movie Animal House!
 

Danny "Hank" Lange followed his dream and actually learned to play that guitar. He recently did a sound track for an award winning film. Check Dan out here: http://www.myspace.com/buskersblues


 

The fall of 1981 brought a new landscape to PCA. Two older buildings across the street had been purchased by the school and turned into dorms. One of these dorms would quickly become a DUCKWORK annex and be dubbed the SWAMP. The SWAMP was home to new DUCKS, Matt Wagner, Mike Leeke, and Dave Johnson, three guys that each would later play a role in the accomplishments of Comico.

 

Joe Cursio was another Jr. Duck who hung out at DUCKWORK and is now living

 
DUCKWORK was populated by students that lived on campus and commuters who often crashed at the office or the SWAMP. SEPTA strikes were usually great bonding experiences for the commuters of which I was one.
 

Joe "Zig" Zigler rarely showed up with clothes on... Joe is a fun pal that we've managed to lose touch with. Joe, if you are out there, drop us a line!

 
One commuting DUCK who recently has emerged on the web-pages of CO2 Comics with his wife and former PCA alumnus, Tina Garceau, is Joe Williams who has recently posted several great flashbacks about DUCKWORK on his blog at www.willceau.com.
You can read Joe’s 5 part DUCKWORK retrospective here.
 
By the time the spring semester had ended in 1982, a total of six issues of DUCKWORK had been published.

It was the end of my junior year at PCA. Phil Lasorda’s older brother Dennis had just purchased a duplex in Norristown for his Physical Therapy practice. He had offered us the opportunity to run Comico out of the half he was not using.

It was time for this DUCK to sink or swim. I left PCA to pursue a dream. Cooch came along as well. Without its leaders DUCKWORK quicky faded away but Comico was about to become official.

When it came time to take the big leap of faith, Vince chose not to commit and Bill took his seat at the drums. Phil, Cooch and I were now the standing partners of Comico as we began to solicit our first publication.
 
Matt Wagner was a prolific contributer to DUCKWORK and continued to contribute as Comico took off. Matt’s feature Grendel first appeared in Comico Primer #2 and went on to become an iconic character in comics. Comico also published Matt’s Mage the Hero Discovered.
 

Matt Wagner, The Comic Artist Discovered.

 
Mike Leeke was significant as an artist on ROBOTECH and later went on to pencil Bill Willingham’s popular ELEMENTALS.
Mike’s contributation to CO2 Comics. The Amazing Liberteens, can be seen Here.
 

Mike Leeke, who would later become the penciler extraordinare of ROBOTECH and ELEMENTALS is just thrilled that he can hide all of his mechanical pencils and rapidograph pens in his tremendous fro!

 
Dave Johnson was also a penciler on the ROBOTECH series.
 

Dave Johnson, former denizen of the SWAMP and penciler on ROBOTECH The Next Generation for Comico.

 
Joe Williams along with his wife Tina Garceau creates Monkey and Bird which is featured here on CO2 Comics.
 

Joe Williams is now a featured artist here on CO2 Comics with his wife Tina

 
Bill and I have ironically redeveloped our webs. We’ve gone from DUCKWORK to Web Comics with a long history in between.
 

Bill "Cooch" Cucinotta reclines on a cardboard 3-D project that was retired to the hall in front of the DUCKWORK office

Ouch! Gerry Giovinco, is another Duck trapped in a world he never made!

 
NOTE: In 1984, two years after the DUCKWORK crew had disbanded at PCA, Jim Carrey makes his Hollywood debut in an NBC television series titled “The Duck Factory” about a quirky group of animators trying to keep their studio alive. Kinda makes you wonder…


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