Posts Tagged ‘Comics’

Thursday Weekly Update | Bughouse

Thursday, August 21st, 2014

New page of BUGHOUSE by Steve Lafler now available.

BUGHOUSE Update

Click Here to read this comic NOW!

Read the 3 Part STEVE LAFLER INTERVIEW
posted on The Comics Journal


NOW AVAILABLE,

Purchase a copy of the EL VOCHO

graphic novel, now on sale

At LULU Here.


Monday Weekly Update | ROMA

Monday, August 18th, 2014

New page of The Adventures of ROMA
by John Workman, now available.

ROMA Update

Click here to read this comic NOW!

Saturday Weekly Update | Dog Boy

Saturday, August 16th, 2014

New page of DOG BOY by Steve Lafler now available.

DOG BOY Update

Click Here to read this comic NOW!

Read the 3 Part STEVE LAFLER INTERVIEW
posted on The Comics Journal


NOW AVAILABLE,

Purchase a copy of the EL VOCHO

graphic novel, now on sale

At LULU Here.

When Diversity is a Gimmick

Tuesday, August 12th, 2014

Last week’s blog was focused on respecting diversity in comics. Diversity does plenty of good for the medium and the market as it creates an opportunity to broaden the audience and explore the boundaries of material offered.

But too often what is masked as an attempt at diversity is actually just a marketing gimmick, dependent on the buzz created by knee jerk reactions to  dramatic changes in major characters that have long been ingrained in our popular culture.

It has become a disappointing  and predictable common practice by publishers to boost sales figures by implementing any of the following strategies:

Kill the character.

Have the character get married.

Expose the character as gay.

Change the gender of the character.

Change the race of the character.

Any one of these options is a guarantee that airtime on The View will follow!

It won’t be long before Whoopi Goldberg will be waving a comic book featuring a traditional white male character that has returned from the dead as an, African- American lesbian about to get married to her same-sex partner!

This is not really a respectful implementation of diversity. This is merely pathetic evidence that the character has become so old and stale that the editors are willing to try anything to spice it up to get attention. It also broadens the corporations ability to protect the trademark, like when Stan Lee quickly generated a She-Hulk and a Spider-Woman after the suggestion that anyone could otherwise easily swipe the characters from Marvel.

Creating diversity in a product line in this manner is like mass producing Santa or plastic Jesus figures of all ethnicity just to appeal to all common denominators possible. It is a confirmation that the character in question is so ingrained in the public consciousness based on its most rudimentary properties that nothing else really matters other than the costume and the powers of that character.

So why change it?

Stan Lee once described Spider-Man’s success as being attributed to the fact that behind the costume Spidey could be any race and that allowed him to appeal to readers of all ethnicities because they could easily imagine themselves as him.

It is possible that idea of  the mask on so many superheroes has allowed whole cultures be able to relate to them, establishing the “modern mythologies” that the trademark owners of superheroes are so proud of?  If that’s the case, the audience has been responsible for diversity in comics through their own imagination.

The success of the Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles is a great example. People don’t relate to them by race. They can’t. They are turtles! Individually they appeal to people by the color of their mask, their weapons and their personalities. That’s all! Ask anybody who their favorite turtle is and most will say, “the red one,” or “the purple one” and so on. Almost anyone can identify with a Ninja Turtle because they are essentially animals that we don’t usually identify by race or gender.

Someday it will be realized by the public that disrupting the foundation of iconic characters in the name of diversity is merely a marketing ploy that dilutes the property and minimizes its cultural impact.

Implementing diversity would be better served by developing new characters created by diverse talents that appreciate the differences of those characters first hand and are willing to target a specific audience. It all goes back to respect. Respect the talent. Respect the audience. Create great, diverse works and the gimmicks won’t be needed.

Making Comics Because We Want to,

Gerry Giovinco



Monday Weekly Update | ROMA

Monday, August 11th, 2014

New page of The Adventures of ROMA
by John Workman, now available.

ROMA Update

Click here to read this comic NOW!

Saturday Weekly Update | Dog Boy

Saturday, August 9th, 2014

New page of DOG BOY by Steve Lafler now available.

DOG BOY Update

Click Here to read this comic NOW!

Read the 3 Part STEVE LAFLER INTERVIEW
posted on The Comics Journal


NOW AVAILABLE,

Purchase a copy of the EL VOCHO

graphic novel, now on sale

At LULU Here.

Thursday Weekly Update | Bughouse

Thursday, August 7th, 2014

New page of BUGHOUSE by Steve Lafler now available.

BUGHOUSE Update

Click Here to read this comic NOW!

Read the 3 Part STEVE LAFLER INTERVIEW
posted on The Comics Journal


NOW AVAILABLE,

Purchase a copy of the EL VOCHO

graphic novel, now on sale

At LULU Here.


Respect Diversity in Comics: It is the Heart of Independence

Tuesday, August 5th, 2014

Diversity is a hot buzzword in the comics industry lately, mostly because we are actually seeing examples of it. Many people have championed diversity for many years as a way of expanding the market and the medium. The expectation is that the broadening diversity currently experienced in the comics industry would be welcomed and celebrated but, unfortunately,  that is not always the case.

The comics industry has a long history of narrow vision when it comes to nearly every aspect of it which has been focused predominantly on white males. People that enjoy comics have been generally comfortable with this for too long. Now that things are changing so is the warm, fuzzy feeling of what has been familiar.

Diversity can refer to many things including race, creed, gender, and sexual orientation. In a comic shop it could simply refer to product diversity like books, clothing and toys. The important thing to remember is that diversity is good especially when it involves a creative medium that is as powerful and communicative as comics.

Heroes Con 2013 Cosplay group shot

Diversity in a medium like comics has the power to bring people together rather than push them apart. If we let it.

The first step to truly encouraging diversity is to actually respect it.  Many find it very easy to give diversity in comics “lip service” but struggle to walk the talk. Too many people squirm when they actually experience attempts at instilling diversity in the medium because deep down it violates their comfort zone and they are unwilling to muster enough respect for the tastes of the broader audience to accept that which is different.

I refuse to call it ignorance, prejudice, bigotry or even small-mindedness because that would be just as disrespectful. Expanding diversity means investing in a willingness to have such a variety of comics that there is product that can appeal to everybody.  It is not the industry’s place to segregate anyone for enjoying something that may be specific to them regardless if they are a minority or a majority. Respect goes both ways. That is how it is achieved. Mutually.

Those that champion diversity have to also accept that which has been homogenous for so many years because true diversity cannot exist without it. Let it be, rather than change it and use all energies to create something new. Then celebrate that. Celebrate all.

We celebrate our diversity everyday at CO2 Comics and are proud of it. That does not mean that we don’t still love the superhero comics that influenced us.  They inspired us to want to create something different and more diverse. Check out our creator page and you will find talented people of all ages, race, gender and orientation none of which matters more than the fact that we respect each and every one of them for who they are as individuals and for their tremendous talents and that they share with us.

Their diversity extends to their creations which are as unique and brilliant as each and every one of them. Their comics speak to the new, broader market place that is now so politically correct. Their comics deserve your respect for their diversity

If you consider yourself  a fan or champion of diversity in comics you owe it to yourself to read and enjoy the diversity we present here at CO2 Comics. If you respect what you find here, you will share it with your friends. Take the time to look, not just here but industry wide, and acknowledge the variety of comics created by others who are not the usual fare and be prepared to be impressed. The industry cannot be diverse if we are unwilling to recognize the diversity that is already there.

Our very special thanks to all of the creators that have ever chosen to break the mold.  We know, through all of your endeavors that the diversity you bring to comics is what truly equals creative independence. You have our respect and always will. You are our inspiration and why we continue to make independent comics.

Making Comics Because We Want to,

Gerry Giovinco



Monday Weekly Update | ROMA

Monday, August 4th, 2014

New page of The Adventures of ROMA
by John Workman, now available.

ROMA Update

Click here to read this comic NOW!

Saturday Weekly Update | Dog Boy

Saturday, August 2nd, 2014

New page of DOG BOY by Steve Lafler now available.

DOG BOY Update

Click Here to read this comic NOW!

Read the 3 Part STEVE LAFLER INTERVIEW
posted on The Comics Journal


NOW AVAILABLE,

Purchase a copy of the EL VOCHO

graphic novel, now on sale

At LULU Here.


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