Archive for February, 2013

Thursday Weekly Update | Bughouse

Thursday, February 28th, 2013

New page of BUGHOUSE by Steve Lafler now available.

BUGHOUSE Update

Click Here to read this comic NOW!

Read the 3 Part STEVE LAFLER INTERVIEW
posted on The Comics Journal


NOW AVAILABLE,

Purchase a copy of the EL VOCHO

graphic novel, now on sale

At LULU Here.


Tuesday Weekly Update | Tales Of ISHMAR: SOFT STUFF

Tuesday, February 26th, 2013

New page of
SOFT STUFF
by Don Lomax is now available.

SOFT STUFF Update

Click here to read this comic NOW!

Self-Publishing is a Virtue

Tuesday, February 26th, 2013

Self-publishing is often perceived with a certain disdain that I always struggle to understand especially when it concerns publishing comics. Self-publishers are usually viewed as purveyors of “Vanity Press” or unrefined rebels, void of editorial and quality control, rather than the enlightened, creative entrepreneurs that they often are.

For the record, I have always considered myself a self-publisher though I have spent a lot of time publishing the works of others. I self-published my first comics in high school. Those comics were printed on a mimeograph machine and distributed from class-to-class and sold for a nickel apiece.

In college, where I met my long time publishing partner Bill Cucinotta, we published a student newspaper, DUCKWORK , with a bunch of like-minded friends that all had an interest in comics.  We were doing our own thing and doing it collectively so I still considered what “we” published as self-published.

Few people remember or realize that Comico began as a self-publishing venture. Our earliest projects all featured comics that we created ourselves.  AZ, Skrog, and Slaughterman were each works of the individual Comico partners, Phil LaSorda, Bill Cucinotta, and myself. Primer was intended an introductory product for our personal projects but became our first vehicle to present the works of others, most notably our former DUCKWORK pal, Matt Wagner, and his signature work Grendel.

It was only fitting that when Bill and I began publishing on the web as CO2 Comics the first features we launched were our earlier works Skrog and Slaughterman . We were self-publishers again!

Because we do enjoy publishing others, we set up CO2 Comics as a cooperative venture where we work closely with creators to present their work on our site. When we do publish works in print we consider the creators our partners and insure that they receive the lion’s share of net profits from sales of their books.

I don’t ever want to lose my perception of being a self-publisher because I consider it a virtue and a right. Cat Yronwode, esteemed comics critic, and editor once questioned our rights to publish what was admittedly amateurish material. Her comment in the Comics Buyer’s Guide sent me into a tizzy back in 1983 because I am so adamant about a creator’s right to have control over their work which is my primary  endorsement for self-publishing. I argued that as Americans we should have the right to publish whatever we want and that the market will determine our fate.

Self-publishing, in fact has integral responsibility for the birth of our nation. Forefather, Ben Franklin, was a self-publisher and champion of freedom of speech. He used his press, his writings and his publishing skills to inspire and encourage the American Revolution. He valued those rights and so should we as comic creators.

This is the sense of independence that comic creators needed when it became obvious that the big comic publishers were taking advantage of them. By the late seventies when people started demanding rights for Superman creators Jerry Siegel and Joe Shuster followed by champions for Steve Gerber and Jack Kirby it became obvious that alternative publishing was necessary in the comics industry

For us, like many others, self-publishing was the answer.  Thanks to the nature of the Direct Market in the comics industry at the time, self-publishers could easily get their foot in the door. A lot of good and bad publishers proliferated but what became clear was that comics could be more than just superheroes and the opportunity for diversity in the medium exploded.  Self-publishing opened the door for creative opportunity that may not have existed otherwise.

The new generation of comic creators with this expanded view of the medium quickly moved to the world wide web and launched a self publishing assault  that proved anything is possible when creating comics. Stick figures capably replaced the anatomically exaggerated superheroes as dominant reading material on the web.

Now, with digital advancements in printing and distribution, the opportunity to self-publish is as accessible and affordable than ever before leaving the greatest challenge to be that of being discovered by an audience.

More than ever, self-publishing is the doorway to creative freedom. As creators, now is the time to encourage each other to embrace the opportunity to swelf-publish, to control your intellectual property and not be victimized by unscrupulous publishers who continue to exploit the antiquated work-for-hire business model.

This is our goal at CO2 Comics. We recognize that not every creator wants the burden of all the details that self-publishing requires wether it be on the web or in print. We want CO2 Comics to be a safe haven for projects to be published while creators retain ownership and control over their property.

More importantly we intend that creators are treated with the dignity and respect that they deserve and would warrant as a self-publisher because we know personally what a virtue self-publishing is.

Making Comics Because We Want to,

Gerry Giovinco


Monday Weekly Update | Eaten By Planet 29

Monday, February 25th, 2013

New page of Eaten By Planet 29
by Kevin Atkinson, now available.

EATEN BY PLANET 29 Update

Click here to read this comic NOW!

Saturday Weekly Update | Dog Boy

Saturday, February 23rd, 2013

New page of DOG BOY by Steve Lafler now available.

DOG BOY Update

Click Here to read this comic NOW!

Read the 3 Part STEVE LAFLER INTERVIEW
posted on The Comics Journal


NOW AVAILABLE,

Purchase a copy of the EL VOCHO

graphic novel, now on sale

At LULU Here.

Thursday Weekly Update | Bughouse

Thursday, February 21st, 2013

New page of BUGHOUSE by Steve Lafler now available.

BUGHOUSE Update

Click Here to read this comic NOW!

Read the 3 Part STEVE LAFLER INTERVIEW
posted on The Comics Journal


NOW AVAILABLE,

Purchase a copy of the EL VOCHO

graphic novel, now on sale

At LULU Here.


Wednesday Weekly Update | Heaven And The Dead City

Wednesday, February 20th, 2013

New page of Heaven and the Dead City
by Raine Szramski, now available.

HEAVEN And The DEAD CITY Update

Click here to read this comic NOW!


Tuesday Weekly Update | Tales Of ISHMAR: SOFT STUFF

Tuesday, February 19th, 2013

New page of
SOFT STUFF
by Don Lomax is now available.

SOFT STUFF Update

Click here to read this comic NOW!

Life Imitates Comics

Tuesday, February 19th, 2013

Last week, in my blog post Mark Millar is Right!, I took a sarcastic tone while agreeing with Millar that a Justice League film would fail. I focused mostly on DC Comics and Warner Brothers’ total disrespect for the classic versions of their iconic characters that comprise the JLA. The current trend being a departure from the original in an effort to make them more contemporary, realistic and edgy. My opinion is that the beloved characters are losing both their recognition and appeal which has been their trademark for three quarters of a century.

Mark Millar’s perspective, sadly, was in line with DC/Warner as he scoffed at the plausibility of the character’s powers and their logistics. He also agreed that the iconic superheroes were outdated.

The urge to adapt comics to “live action” in film, especially superhero comics, is apparently having a devastating affect on the genre if not the comics medium as well.

The most spectacular thing about comics is that, as an artistic medium presented in two dimensions, the audience can experience the unbelievably fantastic adventures of the characters as the creators intended them. These adventures are so astonishing that Hollywood has only recently developed the technology to bring these adventures to the silver screen.  Why then do we want to water them down and make them “more realistic”?

Back in 1978 when the first Superman movie featuring Christopher Reeves as the Man of Steel was released the producers were so excited about their ability to present a definitive Superman that they promoted the film with the tag line “You’ll Believe a Man Can Fly!” They wanted audiences to celebrate and embrace the unbelievable just as readers of the comics did.

I understand that the times have changed and that that Superman wass a character from a simpler time. Audiences were easily thrilled by a man that was faster than a speeding bullet and could leap tall buildings in a single bound, but that was Superman. He was the ultimate good guy with super powers and a girlfriend. He wore blue tights with red trunks, boots and a cape and had a big “S” on his chest.

This summer we get the film Man of Steel but do we really get Superman? I say, “no.” There was an innocence to Superman that made the character remarkable. That is now currently lost to the character in film, in the comics, and in video games like one titled Injustice: Gods Among Us, by the makers of Mortal Kombat.

In this violent video game Lois Lane is pregnant with Superman’s child and is captured, tortured, and mutilated by the Joker and Harley Quinn, who then trick Superman into killing Lois and their unborn child to motivate a raging Superman to fight all the other superheroes in the world.

Really? I’m sure that is not the Superman Jerry Siegel and Joe Shuster intended to create.

Superheroes have taken on the attributes of the ugliness and violence of the real world. The heroes are now less idealistic and suffer from responding with more natural human instinct. This is a case where art imitating life would make Oscar Wilde twist in his grave. Comic creators and film producers alike would do well to look at Wilde’s essay The Decay of Lying and possibly they would have a greater appreciation for the value of the source material.

The real root to my aggravation is how DC and Marvel continue to milk the life out of their premier intellectual properties to avoid paying royalties to creators. Maybe if they were more willing to share some of the profits, creators would to create contemporary IP for them that is associated with fresh new characters instead of defiling the classics.

Until that day, I’d rather see films that truly adapt the superheroes as they were originally intended. Big, bold, colorful, full of action and wonder. I want life to imitate the comics the way it imitates art. Maybe that’s just too much to ask.

Making Comics Because We Want to,

Gerry Giovinco


Monday Weekly Update | Eaten By Planet 29

Monday, February 18th, 2013

New page of Eaten By Planet 29
by Kevin Atkinson, now available.

EATEN BY PLANET 29 Update

Click here to read this comic NOW!


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