Archive for August, 2012

Thursday Weekly Update | Bughouse

Thursday, August 30th, 2012

New page of BUGHOUSE by Steve Lafler now available.

BUGHOUSE Update

Click Here to read this comic NOW!

Read the 3 Part STEVE LAFLER INTERVIEW
posted on The Comics Journal


NOW AVAILABLE,

Purchase a copy of the EL VOCHO

graphic novel, now on sale

At LULU Here.

BUGHOUSE Graphic Album NOW AVAILABLE

Tuesday Weekly Update |
CAPTAIN OBESE

Tuesday, August 28th, 2012

New page of
The Heavy Adventures of CAPTAIN OBESE
by Don Lomax is now available.

CAPTAIN OBESE Update

Click here to read this comic NOW!

Kirby4Heroes: A Granddaughter’s Campaign to Honor Jack Kirby’s 95th Birthday

Tuesday, August 28th, 2012

Celebrating  what would have been Jack Kirby’s 95th birthday and his illustrative carreer as possibly the greatest and most influential comic creator ever, we at CO2 Comics are proud and honored to present our blog as a forum to his granddaughter, Jillian Kirby, to promote her exceptional campaign, Kirby4Heroes, a noble effort to raise funds in Jack Kirby’s name for the Hero Initiative.

Jillian’s post:

As I sit on my bed reading one of my grandfather, Jack Kirby’s, comic books, his characters explode off the page and appear vividly lifelike. I feel like Captain America, Thor, The Avengers, and the Fantastic Four are parading in front of me! At 16 years old, it makes me so sad that I never got to meet my grandfather, who died the year before I was born, but I feel his spirit everywhere. Growing up surrounded with his art, comic books, and family stories, I felt the need to make a stronger connection with the grandfather I never knew.  A 95th birthday present to honor his legacy struck me as an obvious choice, but what could I do?

The spark that ignited my Kirby4Heroes campaign occurred last spring at the dinner table, where my parents, Connie and Neal, were discussing an organization called the Hero Initiative. I learned that the Hero Initiative is the only nonprofit charity that raises money to assist comic book creators, writers and artists in medical or financial need. The mission and uniqueness of this organization immediately impressed me, as I couldn’t believe that currently they are the only nonprofit charity of this kind in the comic book industry.

Then and there, I made a personal commitment to raise money for the Hero Initiative in honor of my grandfather Jack on his 95th birthday. He was a very kind and generous man and would have been among the first to support the Hero Initiative.

One example of my grandfather Jack’s charitable nature can be seen in an anecdote my father shared with me on many occasions. It took place during the Bar Mitzvah of my grandfather’s nephew in a Lower East Side Manhattan synagogue in the early 1960’s.  After the service, his nephew’s family, being of modest means, had just a simple buffet served in the large entrance foyer of the synagogue.  Noticing a homeless man standing in the open doorway, just looking in at the celebration, my grandfather Jack immediately walked over to the man, took him by the arm, led him into the room, sat him down at a table, and served him a plate of food. Not a word was spoken between the two men. My grandfather, himself having grown up in poverty, knew hunger. This act of kindness, typical of my grandfather, inspired me to raise money and awareness for the Hero Initiative, because a charity that helps others in the comic book community and gives aid to those in need exemplifies the devotion my grandfather Jack always had for his fellow man.

Here was my idea. First, since I have lived in California my whole life, and my grandfather lived here for almost 30 years, I would contact over 200 comic book retailers in my home state. Second, as my grandfather Jack was born in Manhattan, I would also get in touch with the major comic retailer in that city: Midtown Comics. Third, I would contact key science and art museums in select metropolitan areas, such as New York City, Chicago, and Los Angeles. It is obvious why I would contact the art museums, but science? Not so much. I decided to approach the science museums because much of my grandfather’s artwork was influenced by and reflects not only the science and technology of his day, but what he envisioned for the future.

After sending out an initial cover letter to the retailers and museums previously mentioned, I personally visited my neighborhood comic book store, Alakazam! Comics in Irvine, CA. This enabled me to get a general feel of how comic stores would react to my Kirby4Heroes campaign. At first, I was pretty nervous and stumbled over my words a bit, but by the end of the explanation of my campaign, because Will Call, the store’s manager, was very enthusiastic and supportive, I gained a great deal of confidence. Mr. Call agreed to set up a donation jar, and he and the store’s owner, Marco Davanzo, additionally pledged to donate 10% of their profits on August 28th to the Hero Initiative! As this was the first comic book retailer I approached, the positive feedback I received from them gave me the impetus to personally contact many major comic book retailers in California, such as Meltdown Comics, Earth-2 Comics, Comics N Stuff, and A-1 Comics, as well as many smaller individual stores.

My Kirby4Heroes campaign was off and running! In total, I contacted over 200 comic book stores by U.S. mail, email, telephone calls, or personal visits. I designed and provided the retailers with a flyer advertising my campaign, a collection jar label, a Kirby4Heroes remittance card and website information for online donations. As a result, many retailers included this information in newsletters, on their Facebook pages and websites in order to reach as many fans as possible. I was hesitant at first about the campaign’s large scale, but my enthusiasm escalated and my concerns disappeared thanks to the outpouring of goodwill from all.

For the next phase of my campaign, my family room was transformed into a mini video production studio. I wrote, produced, and edited a video explaining and advertising the Kirby4Heroes cause. My friend, Daniel, helped direct and set up certain shots. I later was fortunate enough to work with Seth Laderman, the Head of Production of the Nerdist Channel on YouTube, who generously donated his time to help me put some finishing touches on the Kirby4Heroes video. Working with Mr. Laderman was such an educational experience. Geoff Boucher, of the Los Angeles Times Hero Complex, wrote a fantastic article about my campaign and posted my video. Mr. Boucher’s support and encouragement have been constant throughout the duration of this campaign, and his article was instrumental in spreading the word about the Kirby4Heroes cause far beyond the comic book stores. Two days later, the video was released on YouTube via the Nerdist Channel.

I knew that my grandfather Jack was well regarded in the comic book industry, and the reception I have received confirms it. Sometimes I feel his spirit with me, especially when I’m reading comic book anthologies or biographies of my grandfather. I felt him looking over my shoulder when I visited comic book stores, because of how his home had an open door policy and he would let anyone visit, just as the comic book retailers were so welcoming to me. I have been met with such an outpouring of support, and it has truly touched my heart.

When I first started Kirby4Heroes, I was advised to think small, just start with one comic book store. Did Jack Kirby think small?  Thank God, no! He let his imagination soar to heights that have entertained and enlightened us for almost 75 years! So, I went as big as I could, given the time and manpower limitations, and so far this campaign has turned out better than I could ever have imagined! I thank all of the comic book retailers, fans, Geoff Boucher and the rest of the news media, Seth Laderman at the Nerdist Channel, my other grandfather, Gene, my extended Kirby family, and finally my parents, for their guidance. My utmost gratitude is given to CO2 Comics, who provided me the opportunity to share my story. Most of all, I thank my grandfather, Jack Kirby, and all comic book creators in the industry. I’m sure countless fans do the same when they enjoy comic books, characters in movies, and other comic book driven entertainment media.

I need you to support the Kirby4Heroes campaign as well. Today is the day! Please watch my video for further details about how to donate in honor of Jack Kirby’s 95th birthday! For all the fans out there, here’s how you can be a part of the Kirby4Heroes campaign. One way is to visit your local comic book store, or you can mail a donation to the Hero Initiative at this address:

Kirby4Heroes
c/o The Hero Initiative
11301 Olympic Blvd., #587
Los Angeles, CA 90064

Finally, you can donate online at the Hero Initiative website via Paypal, and be sure to type “Kirby4Heroes” where it asks for special instructions.

This journey has not only been deeply satisfying for me as an emotional connection with my grandfather, but conceiving, planning and implementing the Kirby4Heroes campaign has been an invaluable learning experience. Sometimes when I gaze upon grandpa Jack’s drawing board in our small den, I can feel his presence with me.  Because of founding this campaign, I know that he is smiling down on me with pride. I also know that he would want each and every one of you to reach out to the Hero Initiative just as he, long ago, reached out to that downtrodden man in the doorway of the synagogue in New York. Even a dollar can make a difference! The Kirby4Heroes campaign and I thank you so much for your support!

Jillian Kirby

CO2 Comics would like to extend our support to Jillian’s Kirby4Heroes campaign by donating our entire share of all profits made from any of our printed publications sold during the week of Aug 28th-Sept 4th.

This is your opportunity to try something new and contribute to a good cause.

http://www.lulu.com/spotlight/co2comics

http://www.amazon.com/shops/co2comics

BUGHOUSE Graphic Album NOW AVAILABLE

Monday Weekly Update | RIBIT!

Monday, August 27th, 2012

New page of RIBIT!
by Frank Thorne, now available.

RIBIT Update

Click here to read this comic NOW!

Saturday Weekly Update | Dog Boy

Saturday, August 25th, 2012

New page of DOG BOY by Steve Lafler now available.

DOG BOY Update

Click Here to read this comic NOW!

Read the 3 Part STEVE LAFLER INTERVIEW
posted on The Comics Journal


NOW AVAILABLE,

Purchase a copy of the EL VOCHO

graphic novel, now on sale

At LULU Here.

BUGHOUSE Graphic Album NOW AVAILABLE

Thursday Weekly Update | Bughouse

Thursday, August 23rd, 2012

New page of BUGHOUSE by Steve Lafler now available.

BUGHOUSE Update

Click Here to read this comic NOW!

Read the 3 Part STEVE LAFLER INTERVIEW
posted on The Comics Journal


NOW AVAILABLE,

Purchase a copy of the EL VOCHO

graphic novel, now on sale

At LULU Here.

BUGHOUSE Graphic Album NOW AVAILABLE

Tuesday Weekly Update |
CAPTAIN OBESE

Wednesday, August 22nd, 2012

New page of
The Heavy Adventures of CAPTAIN OBESE
by Don Lomax is now available.

CAPTAIN OBESE Update

Click here to read this comic NOW!

Remembering Joe Kubert

Tuesday, August 21st, 2012

Joe Kubert 1926-2012, photo copyright The Kubert School

The news that Joe Kubert had passed away caught me at just after I finished last week’s blog. I was tempted to dive in and rush a last minute tribute in an effort to be timely but I have too much respect for the man and all that he did for comics. I chose to digest the incredible loss to his family, his school and the entire the comics community so that I could write a memorial deserved of a man of his stature.

Whenever I think of Joe Kubert the first thing that comes to my mind is a cover image of Tarzan, knife in hand, battling a savagely maned lion that struck fear in my heart as a young comic reader. The ferocity of the glare in the lion’s eyes, the sinewy muscles of Tarzan, and the dynamic gesture of every appendage on the page (right down to Tarzan’s toes!) captivated my attention in a way that few comics did or could. Joe was capable of creating something primal on a page with lines so kinetic that the images leapt from the page into the deepest, darkest part of the imagination.

Click image to see more Kubert School Advertisements

The name Joe Kubert captured my imagination again with a simple ad  for The Joe Kubert School of Cartoon and Graphic Art that ran in the back of every comic book in the late seventies. Though I couldn’t convince my parents to let me go to a school that promoted itself in a comic book, the idea of studying art for the purpose of  creating comics became my goal. A few years later, as a publisher at Comico, I was offering small scholarships to students at Joe’s school in Dover, NJ hoping to encourage the incredible young talent that was being cultivated there to want to work for Comico. The gesture paid off when we had the opportunity to work with Joe’s sons, Adam and Andy on our JONNY QUEST series.

Joe Kubert visited our modest offices at Comico once when we were first developing our relationship. Our Studio, as we called it, was half a duplex in the middle of blue-collared Norristown, PA. It was a humble creative space littered with art supplies, drawing boards, decrepit furniture and dated, orange shag wall-to-wall carpet. Joe loved it! There was a gleam in his eye as he looked around that space and at us young guys, full of enthusiasm about making comics. He told us stories of how he was reminded him of his early days, holed up in a small room with a bunch of other young writers and artists cramming out entire issues over night in a frantic effort to meet a deadline.

Joe was an infectiously dynamic person with a passion for comics that he was always excited to share and teach. He was the ultimate father figure that commanded respect and returned it when you earned it. That day he visited Comico, without intending to and unknowingly, he ordained us as professional comic creators with his glowing approval.

Similarly, Joe’s impact on the comic industry can never be measured. He has influenced and educated so many comic professionals that it would be impossible to imagine what the industry would have been like without him, his family, or his school.

Bill Cucinotta, the extended CO2 Comics family of creators, and I extend our very heartfelt condolences to the entire Kubert family and to everyone that loved and respected Joe Kubert, one of the very great men to have ever professed to making comics.

Gerry Giovinco

We at CO2 Comics have a long relationship with a former Kubert School student, Chris Kalnick, who worked as an inker on ROBOTECH when we published it as Comico. His comics NON the Transcendental Extraterrestrial and Depth Charge are regular features on the CO2 Comics site. At our request he has offered his own remarks regarding Joe Kubert:

Baker Mansion-Kubert School circa 1977.

It’s funny how sometimes you don’t realize how much someone has impacted your life until you hear of their passing.  This was definitely the case with me regarding Joe Kubert.

35 years ago, fresh on the heels of its groundbreaking first year class, I was one of the second year students who attended The Joe Kubert School of Cartoon and Graphic Art.  The school was small compared to today’s incarnation.  There were something like 25-30 students returning from the first year, and Joe only accepted around 50 of us for its incoming second year class.  The students ran the spectrum from the intensely-focused-and disciplined-artist/storyteller to the recent goofy-high-school-graduate-not-really-knowing-what-the-hell-they-wanted. A lot of us fell in between.

I don’t need to expound on how amazing the school was, its atmosphere, its creative energy, etc… suffice to say, there was nothing like it at the time. Plenty has been written about the school over the years. Even if it wasn’t your intention, you were bound to learn some amount of craft there… not only from Joe and the teachers, but from the other students as well.  Everyone ate, drank, and breathed comic art.  The place swam in it. Those who were there know what I’m talking about.  Their life experience and their art is a little richer for it.

There are many more XQBs than I who have had longer, deeper, more extended relationships with Joe, and they have their stories to tell and their feelings to share.  My relationship with him was somewhat brief, but what I can tell you about Joe is that he was no-nonsense. He shot from the hip.  You knew if he liked something or felt it worked… and you knew if he didn’t.  He commanded respect, personal and professional.  My personal talks with him were few, but they definitely left an impression.  As I’m sure his conversations did with the majority of his students.  My last conversation with Joe is forever etched in my mind, for it was sad in nature. It was about my leaving the school, and Joe expressed his disappointment.  For a cartoonist… not an easy moment to shake.

Joe opened his unique school and by doing so, opened the doors for a tremendous amount of artists who may not have otherwise had the opportunity, support, and camaraderie to develop their craft.  If it wasn’t for Joe, I wouldn’t have developed my craft or the sense of identity that I have today.  I wouldn’t have made the professional friends I have now.  And my youngest daughter wouldn’t have grown up in my studio to become an accomplished young artist herself.  Joe passed away the day after my daughter left home to attend Ringling College of Art and Design as an illustration major.  The coincidence of it is not lost on me… and his legacy seems so much more poignant, his influence so much more obvious.

You are respected, Joe.  I know for a fact that you will be missed.  Thank you.

Chris Kalnick

BUGHOUSE Graphic Album NOW AVAILABLE

Monday Weekly Update | RIBIT!

Monday, August 20th, 2012

New page of RIBIT!
by Frank Thorne, now available.

RIBIT Update

Click here to read this comic NOW!

Saturday Weekly Update | Dog Boy

Saturday, August 18th, 2012

New page of DOG BOY by Steve Lafler now available.

DOG BOY Update

Click Here to read this comic NOW!

Read the 3 Part STEVE LAFLER INTERVIEW
posted on The Comics Journal


NOW AVAILABLE,

Purchase a copy of the EL VOCHO

graphic novel, now on sale

At LULU Here.

BUGHOUSE Graphic Album NOW AVAILABLE


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